Archive for October, 2012

College is Dead

October 22, 2012

Long live college! More on the MOOC movement and its impact.

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Who Killed Liberal Arts?

October 22, 2012

An exploration worth reading. Curriculum, teaching, education, etc.

Gentrification and the African-American church

October 22, 2012

An important issue, though as Scot McKnight notes, the solution of getting two ethnic groups under one spiritual roof is not too central in the discussion. My only note would be that as a resident of Prince George’s County (majority African-American), there has been more suburban flight than at least the article suggests, though I am thankful for those churches who have stayed. But how they adapt to this new reality seems to be just as hindered by culture as white churches were hindered in earlier transitional neighborhoods. Here’s where I pine a bit for a more Catholic notion of parish and place…

Complementarianism?

October 21, 2012

Carl Trueman suggests we have some reason to be confused by how this debate plays out. I think he raises good points.

And here’s some other related discussion.

Galileo’s Telescope

October 21, 2012

And more from James K. A. Smith. Here on science and faith, hoping for an alternative to the current options. Worth a read.

On Christian Sociology

October 21, 2012

An interesting discussion about what it means to be a Christian sociologist. I think the author is right that there is something more than a very vague and insipid input of faith, but it is not always easy to nail it down! But this is a helpful discussion.

America a Christian Nation?

October 21, 2012

A discussion by two excellent evangelical historians. A good resource for those who want a trustworthy explanation.

Free College?

October 21, 2012

Several possible future scenarios for higher education, including free education.

The Rise of the Adulteress Woman

October 20, 2012

I don’t think this is progress, but the statistics are interesting.

Do Evangelicals Hate Jesus?

October 20, 2012

So argues Phil Zuckerman. His point is more that they reject Jesus’ teaching. The essay is clouded by some confusion; supporting government programs is not necessarily equivalent to caring for the poor or charity, for example. There are thoughtful arguments that charity is best done on a personal or local level, by organizations like churches rather than government. But don’t let that consistent confusion crowd out the part that seems true: sometimes we don’t take Jesus seriously and find ourselves more shaped by culture than the gospel (in fact, I’d suggest his conflation of government with Christian care for the poor may be another version of the same problem). I’ve been in churches where church action to care for the poor was resisted as part of the social gospel (kind of embarrassing, really). And it does seem as if economic prosperity and security is way too high a value for many evangelicals. So at least we need to be sure we can answer how we follow Jesus’ teachings on mercy and forgiveness, on material possessions, on priorities, and more.